Category Archives: Vegetarian

Late August in Spy Garden

Before (can you see the monarch wing inside?)

Before (can you see the monarch wing inside?)

After

After

Another After (and of course the monarch is flitting around the garden!)

Another After (and of course the monarch is flitting around the garden!)

Blazing Star wildflowers and marigolds

Blazing Star wildflowers and marigolds

White spider on the blazing star wildflowers

White spider on the blazing star wildflowers

Nasturtiums

Nasturtiums

(Purposely) blurry shot of the nasturtiums looking very painterly

(Purposely) blurry shot of the nasturtiums looking very painterly

Chinese long noodle beans. I didn't plant these this year, but volunteers are popping up in a few places.

Chinese long noodle beans. I didn’t plant these this year, but volunteers are popping up in a few places.

The variegated leaves are "upper ground sweet potato" (a winter squash) and the pumpkin is "Jarrahdale" (a blue winter squash). Both varieties are growing on the teepee

The variegated leaves are “upper ground sweet potato” (a winter squash) and the pumpkin is “Jarrahdale” (a blue winter squash). Both varieties are growing on the teepee

Yum!

Yum!

A green dragonfly

A green dragonfly

A perfect "early fall" shot!

A perfect “early fall” shot!

Evening Sky Over Spy Garden

Evening Sky Over Spy Garden

Hope your week is off to a good start! A Squirrely Garden (the garden at Baby’s school) update is coming soon. In the meantime, I’m sharing a school-wide email with you as a little sneak preview of something cool in progress at her school (and because it’s hilarious)…

Dear Friends,
Have you noticed the weird wooden box that’s been pretending to mind its own business by our front door?  No, it’s not a penalty box for obstinate children.  It’s a solar dehydrator!  And it will help us reach our food goal of “all local, all year.”
But there’s a catch.  We need your cans.  About 300 of them will do.  We need them for the solar panel.  Now we know that many of you would never own up to drinking soda or the various other…er…beverages that come in cans.  But we all know there’s some in your fridge right now.  So go ahead and tip ’em back.  Then put on a brave face and bring those cans to in.  No one will judge you.
Oh, and don’t feel bad about the type of…er…beverage the cans are branded with.  They will all be spray painted black to absorb heat from the sun and protect the innocent.
Hahhaha

Seven Seven

Soaking it up

Soaking it up

Baby in the Garden

Baby in the Garden

Temptation

Temptation

Little Sunflowers

Little Sunflowers

Garlic Harvest!

Garlic Harvest!

All of this garlic (probably about 200 heads!) was started with a small handful of seeds some of our friends gave us about four years ago.

Garlic Seeds

Garlic Seeds

Garlic Seed

Garlic Seed

This particular variety of garlic has beautiful purple skins on the cloves (I will share more garlic pictures soon!)

This particular variety of garlic has beautiful purple skins on the cloves (I will share more garlic pictures soon!)

For now, all of the garlic is hanging up in this small breezeway at our back door. Garlic needs to cure for about 30 days; the ideal place for curing garlic is shaded with good airflow.

Last year I tied it in bunches and hung it from twine, this year I just shoved it in between the spaces of this hanging planter; worked like a charm!

Last year I tied it in bunches and hung it from twine, this year I just shoved it in between the spaces of this hanging planter; worked like a charm!

While harvesting garlic, we also dug up some onions…

Jaune Paille des Vertus on the Left, Ailsa Craig on the Right

Jaune Paille des Vertus on the Left, Ailsa Craig on the Right

Cantare Green Beans: very tender and delicious!

Cantare Green Beans: very tender and delicious!

Jalepenos

Jalepenos

Red romaine, and Swiss chard in the background

Red romaine, and Swiss chard in the background

Baby demonstrates how to eat a Delikatesse cucumber.

Baby demonstrates how to eat a Delikatesse cucumber.

Hibiscus Buds

Hibiscus Buds

Many little Delice de la Table melons appearing!

Many little Delice de la Table melons appearing!

Dexie in the Garden

Dexie in the Garden

Blackberry Bloom

Blackberry Bloom

Upper ground sweet potato squash has pretty green and silver foliage.

Upper ground sweet potato squash has pretty green and silver foliage.

Atlantic Giant Pumpkin

Atlantic Giant Pumpkin

How big will it get?

How big will it get?

7.7 Last Year

Limbing, Harvesting

Harvesting...

Harvesting…

But first, the limbing…

Timber!

Timber!

This big branch was shading a large part of the garden; majorly affecting the growth in the teepee area. Sort of scary to cut it down…WHERE WOULD IT FALL?

Perfect Landing!

Perfect Landing!

It fell directly on the grassy path (seen in the photo above): pretty awesome!

Love this shot of the delicate love-in-a-mist blooms: spared by inches of the heavy falling branch!

Love this shot of the delicate love-in-a-mist blooms: spared by inches of the heavy falling branch!

It did do some damage to our new plum tree, but it should bounce back.

You can see from this angle how long the branch was!

You can see from this angle how long the branch was!

The branch broke off pretty jaggedly when Smoochie was cutting it.

The branch broke off pretty jaggedly when Smoochie was cutting it.

But he cleaned it up: hopefully the tree will survive: it was a pretty big limb.

But he cleaned it up: hopefully the tree will survive: it was a pretty big limb.

The shape of the cut looks like a crest. Maybe we can design and etch in a Spy Garden crest!
So that’s the limbing. All the wood has been cleaned up and…

Stacked!

Stacked!

As for the harvesting…Not my strong suit. I realize the garden is a vegetable garden so that may seem weird. But, the first few years I grew vegetables the deer did most of the harvesting. Then last year once the deer fence was in place, a new predator moved in. Baby took a bite of most every piece of produce and then she and The Spy enjoyed flinging squash and tomatoes around the garden. And we don’t compost (YET) (JUDGE NOT LEST YE BE JUDGED). So, yes, we may have discovered the origin of the tradition of throwing tomatoes, but my harvesting skills still need fine-tuning.

Not just a subject for photos anymore!

Not just a subject for photos anymore!

This year, I’ve been making a much better effort to harvest and make my lunch everyday from garden goodies. My go-to method has been to: fill up the sink with water and put in the whole mess of veggies and swish it around: all the dirt falls to the bottom. Then dry it off, rough chop it, pile into a roasting pan with some olive oil. I’ve had a month+ full of salads, but the heat has finally turned the lettuces pretty bitter. I’ve heard that leaving them in the fridge a few days will remove the bitter taste, but I’ve tried that and it hasn’t worked in the past. I find roasting greens (yes! even lettuce) works well. Roast around 350 for 20-40 minutes (depending on the thickness of whatever you are roasting), then make a chiffonade of lettuce leaf basil, flat leafed parsley, thyme, oregano and purple opal basil (or whatever other mix of herbs you fancy) and garnish the roasted vegetables with it (and salt/pepper). Yum!

And a few more sights from around the garden…

Banana Plant, mid-planting (given to us by a neighbor)

Banana Plant, mid-planting (given to us by a neighbor)

Squash Blossom Puppet Show

Squash Blossom Puppet Show haha

Great

Great

Spangled

Spangled

Fritillary

Fritillary

A bee? A hummingbird? A moth!

A bee? A hummingbird? A moth!

Purple Flower

Purple Flower