Mid-November in Spy Garden

Spy Garden November 2014

Spy Garden November 2014

Swinging

Swinging

Weeeeee!

Weeeeee!

Circus...

Circus…

...practice. haha

…practice. haha

Circus Harmony does weekly circus training classes at Baby’s Forest School. They offer flying trapeze lessons and other fun classes. Here is an excerpt from their website:

RUN AWAY & JOIN THE CIRCUS & STILL BE HOME IN TIME FOR DINNER!

At the Circus Harmony Center on the third floor of City Museum and at numerous outreach locations throughout the St. Louis area, we offer a wide array of circus arts classes for ages 5 through adult. We have Fall and Winter/Spring and Summer sessions. You can also book workshops and private lessons any time of the year at City Museum or to come to you. Click on the link below for our current class schedule.

Our staff is headed by Jessica Hentoff, who has over 39 years of circus teaching and performing experience and includes Honored Artist of Mongolia, Rosa Yagaantsetseg, International Jugglers’ Association Excellence in Education Award Winner…(source)

Sounds fun, right? We have juggling clubs here (and I can juggle six with another person!) and our have some “circus” equipment; but I think I would like to add a Cloud Swing and Slackline and maybe a tightrope…;) haha

Upside Down

Upside Down

Spy Garden Garlic

Spy Garden Garlic

Still haven’t planted our garlic yet: maybe this weekend! Each one of the cloves will grow a whole head of garlic by early summer if planted now.

Sunset with woodpile in the backyard

Sunset with woodpile in the backyard

Apple

Apple

Mmm apple season! Here are some descriptions of locally grown apples…

Jonathan – Thin skin, creamy yellow meat with a great snap and wonderful balance of sweet / tart flavors and natural spiciness. At home raw on a fruit plate or baked into pie.

Fuji – Firm, dense flesh, reliably crispy, juicy and sweet with great shelf life. Excellent chopped in muffins and cakes; one of the best for serving raw. I served thousands of them on cheese plates raw, sliced, dunked in lemon water.

Granny Smith – Very crisp, tart, refreshing apple that combines well with sweeter varieties in baking, clearly preferable for use in salads.

Golden Delicious – Mellow, sweet apple suffered from years of mass-production abuse. Google it today and you see “very good flavor when home grown”.

Arkansas Black – Pretty dark red right now, they are good storage apples and the skin darkens in storage. A very solid apple, the slices will remain crisp in baking. Good acidity and a touch of astringency make a great back drop for fall spices.

Rome Beauty – 19th century heirloom originating in the township of Rome, Ohio. Very crunchy which makes this an outstanding pie apple for holding its shape and not weeping in the crust. Not super-sweet so takes well of apple pie spices and compliments without clashing on the cheese plate.

Winesap Hard to find heirloom, very juicy, sweet-tart, deep, rich, spicy and, well, winey flavor. Eat raw, bake, excellent with cheese.

EmpireI see the flavor described as “vinous” but I would say melon-like, even elderflower. Great for raw applications or baked in a mix with other varieties.

Cortland – A McIntosh cultivar, red skin blushed with green and white to pale pink flesh. Nearly all US production is in New York State, almost within sight of Cornell University where it was developed at the start of the 20th century. Sweet-tart, all purpose apple good for jelly, pies, apple sauce, cider, fruit leather and all around eating too. Slow to brown when cut.

Crispin – Also known as Mutsu , a green apple with very sweet, honeyed flavors, juicy, crunchy and crispy. Excellent eating out of hand and very good baking.

Braeburn – Great eating apples originated in New Zealand in the 1950’s. Thin, yellow-green skin with a dark scarlet blush, its very juicy and moderately sweet with a remarkable depth of, well, appley flavor that suggests cinnamon before you add any.

Firm Gold – Related to Granny Smith, green skin, juicy flesh with a firm bite of acidity and a caramel-y sweetness.

All Apples mix or match – $2.50 / pound – 20lb case of a single variety – $2 / pound

These descriptions are from Baby’s school: they email out a LOooooong list of locally grown foods each week and you can order things and pick them up at the school. I’ve never ordered before (can’t believe I missed another fall opportunity to sample the elusive pawpaw!) But I do love reading the descriptions…

Missouri Seckel Pears The Seckel (SEHK-uhl) Pear (aka the Sugar Pear) is superb for salads, sliced on sandwiches, for pickling or spicing. It is a true open-pollinated heirloom variety so there are lots of genetic variations and these, from Berger, Missouri are much larger than the standard Seckel. Like most pears, they are harvested pretty hard and ripen after picking. They are great for poaching right away, soften and sweeten in a paper bag in a few days to make a wonderful tart or pear sauce.

$2.75 / pound – 20lb case – $2.25 / pound

Illinois Asian Pears I haven’t had local Asian Pears before so I’m looking forward. They arrive Thursday morning and I’m expecting juicy, crunchy, creamy white flesh with a sweet tang and lovely aroma. $2.75 / pound – 20lb case – $2.25 / pound

Fall Rhubarb There doesn’t seem to be any commercial Rhubarb productions around here, so you have to find fanatics who love the stuff so much that they plant way too much for themselves and have extra to sell. If you are determined to use it with Strawberries, you are in luck. I have beautiful sweet local Strawberries in my freezer from the height of the dearly departed summer season but lots of good Rhubarb preparations do no need the crutch of Strawberries. 6.50 / pound

Frozen Elderberries – Big flavor, deep color, tiny berries, huge anti-oxidants. Associated in European folklore with fairies and elves, here is 100% edible frozen Elderberries packed into zip lock bags like buckshot in a shell. Very good for jam, great in muffins, excellent sauce for game meats. See what you come up with.

Apx. 4.5 lb. bags – $9 / pound

Aren’t they fun descriptions? Maple syrup, milled sorghum flour, flavored vinegars, pickled peppers, brown rice…It goes on, and on and on…for seven more pages! And ALL of these things are grown/prepared right here in Missouri! The descriptions remind me of those in seed catalogs (which we will soon be receiving in the mail)! Reading seed catalogs is a good cold weather activity: and we need lots of those because Baby, it’s cold outside! There were flurries here today. My poor silver dollar eucalyptus; it’s a huge plant in the garden I plan to dig up and bring indoors: hopefully it will survive until I can get out there and brave the cold and dig it up! But not tonight: Brrr! It’s in the 20’s (F) and windy. I prefer swimming laps in a warm pool to gardening while I adjust to the earlier darkness and the weather! Baby and I are also working diligently on our ballet. It’s more like yoga + ballet. So yollet. Yollet TM haha

Yollet. Classical music required.

Yollet. Classical music required.

Baby

Baby

Yollet. It’s a thing. #arabesqueallday

So awesome! (source)

So awesome! (source)

So inspiring! And check out these three pretty ballerina pictures below. They are from the ballerina project 

Garden Gate Inspiration (source)

Garden Gate Inspiration (source)

Tree Ballet (source)

Tree Ballet (source)

Photographs by Dane Shitagi (source)

Photographs by Dane Shitagi (source)

The majority of ballerinas who have posed for the project are currently or have danced for companies such as American Ballet Theater, Boston Ballet, Birmingham Royal Ballet, Dresden Semperopera Ballet, Tulsa Ballet, Pennsylvania Ballet, Complexions Contemporary Ballet, Miami City Ballet, Suzanne Farrell Ballet, Ballet West, New York City Ballet, San Francisco Ballet and Pacific Northwest Ballet… (source)

And one more priceless ballet picture I came across this week…

#blackswan HAhahahah (source)

#blackswan HAhahahah (source)

So yes, Yollet, that is how Baby and I are celebrating the beautiful art of Ballet. More on our arabesques soon. But for now, I would like to define the helfie. That’s hair + selfie.

#helfie

#helfie

#hairchopsticks #helfie

#hairchopsticks #helfie

#90scomeback #helfie

#90scomeback #helfie

And a few more random things to share…

My mom's first harvest! It's growing time in Florida! Radishes were the first thing I ever grew and harvested too!

My mom’s first harvest! It’s growing time in Florida! Radishes were the first thing I ever grew and harvested too!

Bonfire

Bonfire

Missouri River; facing north/northeast from the Daniel Boone Bridge

Missouri River; facing north/northeast from the Daniel Boone Bridge

Happy Thursday Friends!

2 thoughts on “Mid-November in Spy Garden

  1. narf77

    Yollet…you are right to Trademark that! Looks like teddy is into Yollet as well…My second cousin was the Prima ballerina in the West Australian ballet company and danced all over the world. What a life she has had! She teaches now but I always remember how exotic she always seemed to be to we non ballet relatives. Nice helfies by the way ;)

    Reply

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