Marigolds

October in the Garden

October in the Garden

As the squash vines die back and the tomatoes slow down; the marigolds take over…

We have about 5 varieties of marigolds...

We have about 5 varieties of marigolds…

Some are big and frilly, like the yellow marigolds on either side of the arbor.

Some are big and frilly, like the yellow marigolds on either side of the arbor.

Marigolds with 5 leaves; no frills

Marigolds with 5 leaves; no frills

The masses of marigolds are reminiscent of the changing leaves above them!

The masses of marigolds are reminiscent of the changing leaves above them!

I love these harlequin striped marigolds.

I love these harlequin striped marigolds.

Some of the harlequin striped variety are all red or all yellow.

Some of the harlequin striped variety are all red or all yellow.

An upper ground sweet potato beginning to grow (among the marigolds)

An upper ground sweet potato beginning to grow (among the marigolds)

Teepee

Teepee

Another upper ground sweet potato in the teepee patch

Another upper ground sweet potato in the teepee patch

Giant Cape Gooseberries and more marigolds in the background.

Giant Cape Gooseberries and more marigolds in the background.

The gooseberries look like little lanterns

The gooseberries look like little lanterns

Pineapple Sage

Pineapple Sage

Both the leaves and blooms of pineapple sage are edible.

Paradicsom Alaku Sarga Szentes Pepper; hows that for a name?

Paradicsom Alaku Sarga Szentes Pepper; how’s that for a name?

I think I actually chose those pepper seeds because of the ridiculously long name haha. Baby loves to eat these plain. They are crunchy and sweet and do not get bitter as sweet bell peppers often do in our garden. They will turn yellow if allowed to ripen further, but taste great green as well. Here is the description of the…

Paradicsom Alaku Sarga Szente Sweet Pepper…

One of the truly great Hungarian peppers. Yellow, flat, ribbed, pumpkin-shaped fruit have the tremendous flavor that peppers from Hungary are famous for. The flesh is very thick, crisp and juicy. This rare variety was collected at a farmersโ€™ market in Matrafured, Hungary, but developed at Szentes, Hungary. A winning variety. (description from rareseeds.com)

Another favorite of mine in the garden right now is the…

Eucalptus

Eucalptus

This awesome plant (about six feet tall and gloriously fragrant) started off from a little seedling purchased at the Missouri Botanical Garden’s herb show this past spring. That link is for all you southern hemisphere-ers enjoying spring now!

Another view of the Euc

Another view of the Euc

Happy Friday!

Happy Friday!

9 thoughts on “Marigolds

  1. Eliza Waters

    I’m amazed at how fast and tall that euc has grown in one season. (Wow!) I love the harlequin marigolds – they look just like the juggler’s costumes at the King’s Court. Guess that’s where they got their name! Maybe that will give you an idea for *your* Halloween costume, being a juggler yourself! ;-) Will the gooseberries turn orange? The look like Chinese lanterns to me. Are they the same thing, just a different common name? Your garden still looks so great. Mine is just about done. A few salvia and the calendula are still producing well. Great late season pollinator plant. Today I found a little bee asleep in one of the flowers!

    On Fri, Oct 17, 2014 at 6:47 AM, Spy Garden wrote:

    > Spy Garden posted: ” As the squash vines die back and the tomatoes > slow down; the marigolds take over… Both the leaves and blooms of > pineapple sage are edible. I think I actually chose those pepper seeds > because “

    Reply
    1. Spy Garden Post author

      I love finding sleeping bees! Gooseberries are like ground cherries. The paper on the outside dries out and when it turns tan/brown they are ripe: the berries are yellow. We probably have a few more weeks until the first frost, so things are still very colorful!

      Reply
  2. narf77

    I need to make me a bean tepee…and a pumpkin frame, and something for the sugar-snap peas! Vertical is going to be the way for Sanctuary. Could you share the botanical name of those upper ground sweet potatoes with us please? They are most interesting. We have pineapple sage flowering as well and it carried on right through winter with very little damage from the frost. Our marigolds are just starting to open and the possums have finally stopped scoffing all of the cape gooseberry leaves and are letting it grow again. Cheers for the springy link, it was enjoyed :). Spring has most definitely sprung here and is halfway to gone. The weather has been magnificent, cool in the mornings and sunny with glorious blue skies in the day. Brunhilda is still pumping out the warmth but we tamp her down in the days and soon she will get to sleep for a while. It’s amazing how many plants share our hemispheres or maybe Serendipity Farm is just a little bit strange (you think?! ;) )

    Reply
    1. Spy Garden Post author

      Vertical is great. Here is the description of upper ground sweet potato: “(C. moschata) This heirloom is still grown by a few people in the South. An old, hardy type that grows well even in rather poor conditions and produces an abundance of medium-large, round-to-bell-shaped, tan fruit with moist orange flesh that is said to resemble that of the sweet potato, hence the name. Sweet, good quality, and it keeps very well. A really rugged variety that is going the way of the dinosaurs if people don’t work to save it.” Cheers to you and your glorious weather! Strange is just another word for interesting;)!

      Reply
      1. narf77

        I wonder if we could get said “C. moschata” here? Might have to do a bit of narfish detective work methinks! Cheers for the info :) I might have skited about our glorious weather too soon as the skies are now grey and it is officially just about to rain BUT that means I don’t have to water the gardens so WOOT :)

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