The Last of Summer and The St. Louis Art Museum

Pictures of the garden on August 31, 2014

Spy Garden August 31, 2014

Spy Garden August 31, 2014

Rouge Vif d'Etampes Pumpkin

Rouge Vif d’Etampes Pumpkin

Facing South

Facing South

Facing North (on the other side of the trellis)

Facing North (on the other side of the trellis)

Atlantic Giant Pumpkin Patch

Atlantic Giant Pumpkin Patch

Can you spy a pumpkin with a blue bow?

Can you spy a pumpkin with a blue bow?

Catching Bugs

Catching Bugs

Lemon Cucumber Stretching to the Sky (on the top of the trellis)

Lemon Cucumber Stretching to the Sky (on the top of the trellis)

See the tiny spider?

See the tiny spider?

Knockout Roses

Knockout Roses

Belgian White Carrot Seedhead

Belgian White Carrot Seedhead

Fringed Variegated Lavender

Fringed Variegated Lavender

Purple Opal Basil, Yellow Marigolds and Peppers

Purple Opal Basil, Yellow Marigolds and Peppers

And yesterday, a visit to the St. Louis Art Museum…

Columns with White Sky (St. Louis Art Museum)

Columns with White Sky (St. Louis Art Museum)

I was drawn to the classical painting and sculpture…

late 2nd century BC–early 1st century AD

Greek

Hellenistic period
(323–31 BC)

or Roman

Imperial period
(27 BC–AD 330) (source)

It’s all just a good guess really, I mean no one REALLY knows EXACTLY where these pieces were found or when they were made…It’s what makes ancient art so mysterious!

Spy Garden's own classical sculpture...in fire! (2013)

Spy Garden’s own classical sculpture…in fire! (2013)

Check out How to Sculpt for inspiration/instructions on how to make your own sculptures!

Matisse is one of my favorites…

Interior at Nice, Matisse, 1919 (photo credit St. Louis Art Museum)

Interior at Nice, Matisse, 1919 (photo credit St. Louis Art Museum)

I also like Frank Stella…

Marriage of Reason and Squalor, Frank Stella (photo credit: St. Louis Art Museum)

Marriage of Reason and Squalor, Frank Stella (photo credit: St. Louis Art Museum)

With a housepainter’s brush, Frank Stella methodically applied industrial enamel paint to the surface of this canvas. Thick black bands form concentric rectangles cut off along the bottom edge while thin off-white lines reveal unpainted portions of the canvas. The artist used an extra thick stretcher, a novel decision in 1959 that allowed Stella to emphasize that a painting is, in fact, a three-dimensional object. When asked about the content of his austere works such as this, Stella answered, “What you see is what you see,” underscoring the artist’s matter-of-fact, literal approach to painting. (source)

Richard Serra’s drawings to plan a large sculptural installation in St. Louis remind me of the Spy Garden deer fence plans:

Drawing Related to Twain, Richard Serra, 1982 (photo credit St. Louis Art Museum)

Drawing Related to Twain, Richard Serra, 1982 (photo credit St. Louis Art Museum)

Never underestimate a good sketch!

2013

2013

2014

2014

And the 2015 garden plan? Coming soon! But back to the St. Louis Art Museum…

DSC_0389 (700x634)

Andy Goldsworthy, Stone Sea

Andy Goldsworthy, Stone Sea

Andy Goldsworthy, Stone Sea, 2012

Andy Goldsworthy, Stone Sea, 2012

I also enjoyed the Native American exhibits…

Soft, warm cradleboards shelter babies from the wind and cold, and provide a secure place for mothers to keep their young ones safe while they work and travel. Children often become so attached to their cradleboards that they try to crawl back into them even after they have outgrown them. Family members create cradleboards and imbue these objects with love, symbolic power, and protection. This cradleboard is of exceptional quality and reflects distinctive elements of outstanding Tsistsistas (Cheyenne) work, a tradition noted for technical excellence, crisp, even beadwork, and design shapes that include outlined hexagons and stepped “tipi” triangles with interior square doors. (source)

With every step or rush of wind, the rows of diagonal fringe and metal cones encircling this dress would sway and make a pleasing sound. The creation of sound and a sense of movement are hallmarks of the Southern Plains style. The long sides and neckline preserve the shape of the deer’s hind legs and tail to emphasize the raw material from which the dress was made, and to invest the wearer with the spirit of the once-living creature. (source)

One more favorite painting from my visit…

oil on canvas, Canaletto (Giovanni Antonio Canal) 1697–1768 (photo credit St. Louis Museum of Art)

oil on canvas, Canaletto (Giovanni Antonio Canal) 1697–1768 (photo credit St. Louis Museum of Art)

Compositionally (if that’s not a word, file it under neologisms) similar, but back at home…

Catch

Catch

and a test…

Good job Spy! Though, I would give it a 99, he forgot to capitalize Tennessee. haha;)

Good job Spy! Though, I would give it a 99, he forgot to capitalize Tennessee. haha;)

Happy Wednesday, friends!

9 thoughts on “The Last of Summer and The St. Louis Art Museum

  1. narf77

    Those pumpkins are absolutely stunning. The bright orange colour of their skin! You will have to let me know what they taste like. More garden gorgeousness and a lesson in history and art? This blog rocks! :)

    Reply
    1. Spy Garden Post author

      Thanks. There are many shades of orange; another variety “upper ground sweet potato” just started to fruit and it is variegated green. I sampled the Atlantic Giant last night; lots of spices and roasted in the oven: DELICIOUS!

      Reply
  2. Alan @ it's not work, it's gardening!

    So much fun! So envious of the deer fence…

    I’d love to have you visit my garden the next time you’re in town. Contact me!

    Reply
  3. puppiesinparadise

    How Spy garden has grown this summer! I like the design and style you chose for your garden. You and your family are set with pumpkins for cooking with and for Halloween this year. I see that your pumpkin bras were a great success. I am amazed at the size of them and how many there are. Is this the first time that you have grown pumpkins?

    Congratulat Spy on a job well done on his test.

    I enjoyed the native american exhibit the best.
    Thanks for sharing
    Honey

    Reply
    1. Spy Garden Post author

      I have grown pumpkins before but never with this much success! Yes, the beadwork and designs of the native American exhibit were beautiful! Thanks for the comments!

      Reply

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