The End of June in the Garden and Concrete Sculptures

Facing North in the Garden

Facing North in the Garden

Cilantro seeds are drying on the teepee for now, but the pumpkins are just about ready to climb it. We’ve added a few ornamentals in the garden, including this hibiscus in the foreground with dark purple foliage.

The first cucumber (Delikatesse)!

The first cucumber (Delikatesse)!

Watering

Watering

The "Reef"

The “Reef”

Atlantic Giant Pumpkin Patch and the garden in the background (facing west)

Atlantic Giant Pumpkin patch and the garden in the background (facing west)

I spy a pumpkin!

I spy a pumpkin!

The Atlantic Giant pumpkins are very yellow! This one is about the size of baby’s head. In order to get the biggest pumpkins you are supposed to snip off all but one or two pumpkins per vine. I’ve been doing this and eating the little pumpkins as you would yellow summer squash. The garden is primed for some serious growing in July. We are hoping for the teepee and the arbor to be covered with squash vines in the coming weeks. All the garlic will soon be dug up and hung to cure. The only major problem we are facing right now are ants on the eggplant. I’ve tried coffee, garlic and baking powder and they are still all over the eggplants. Tomorrow, they die. Vinegar? Cornmeal? I’m going to try everything in the arsenal!

Baby showing off...

Baby showing off…

Our favorite...

Our favorite…

Umbrella

Umbrella

And now, for the concrete sculpture tutorial…

Bag of Quikrete

Bag of Quikrete

Add Water,

Add Water,

Mix well.

Mix well.

The Spy's facial expression foreshadows how well this project turns out.

The Spy’s facial expression foreshadows how well this project turns out.

Insert something about too many cooks here.

Insert something about too many cooks here.

Here's hoping for a planter (or a mini-firepit)

Here’s hoping for a planter (or a mini-firepit)

Alas, it was not to be.

Alas, it was not to be.

RIP

RIP

Moon Ball

Moon Ball

Well, its sort of shaped like a ball.

Well, its sort of shaped like a ball.

Lessons learned: start with smaller things. And if you try to make a ball, it needs to be set inside a box (like a cardboard box) so that the sides will be supported and it will be more evenly round. You can also mix portland cement with peat moss and perlite to make hypertufa and then your sculptures won’t weigh a thousand pounds but that route requires measuring and curing and googling ratios, which is why we went with the $7 bag of Quikcrete and just winged it. Haha. We shall see how painting these improves their sculptural worth.

Until next time!

13 thoughts on “The End of June in the Garden and Concrete Sculptures

  1. Pingback: Late October in Spy Garden 2015 | Spy Garden

  2. Eliza Waters

    I suspect that the ants are “farming” aphids or some sweet producer like scale. Have you seen anything else on the eggplants? No vinegar, you’ll get wilted salad!

    Reply
    1. Spy Garden Post author

      I poured vinegar on the dirt (where there were no plants), plus chopped up some onions put them in the dirt around where they were. And doused the plants them selves in cardamom. Haven’t seen ants on them again!

      Reply
  3. John

    Great update. I love the reef. I tried making sculptures one year and it didn’t go well. Quickcrete makes a quick-drying casting concrete too, but bubbles were a problem.

    Reply
  4. puppiesinparadise

    Your garden looks wonderful! You have such a huge garden.. What a great pumpkin patch..You should be so proud with your success. This looks like your best vegetable patch yet. congrats!!!

    I had such a good laugh reading about your families adventure making concret sculpture art. It sounds like all of you had a blast. I am sure painting it will transform it.
    Honey

    Reply
      1. Spy Garden Post author

        I have grown Connecticut field pumpkins before and upper ground sweet potato but never had a bountiful pumpkin harvest (just several smallish ones) so praying we do this year!!

      2. puppiesinparadise

        I have read that pumpkins can take some extra work to grow. That is why I was so impressed that yours look so great. I admire the skill required to get it to grow as well as your patch.

        We would have to grow them in our poly tunnel or make a small one. I am the only one who loves pumpkin pie, pumpking bread… so it doesnt seem worth all the effort.

        I would like to try cantelopes next year. I know we would be fighting over eating themand I know the work wouldn’t go to waste. LOL. I will have to read up on it during the winter to be ready for next year’s planting season.
        Good Luck with your Pumpkin!
        Honey

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