Limbing, Harvesting

Harvesting...

Harvesting…

But first, the limbing…

Timber!

Timber!

This big branch was shading a large part of the garden; majorly affecting the growth in the teepee area. Sort of scary to cut it down…WHERE WOULD IT FALL?

Perfect Landing!

Perfect Landing!

It fell directly on the grassy path (seen in the photo above): pretty awesome!

Love this shot of the delicate love-in-a-mist blooms: spared by inches of the heavy falling branch!

Love this shot of the delicate love-in-a-mist blooms: spared by inches of the heavy falling branch!

It did do some damage to our new plum tree, but it should bounce back.

You can see from this angle how long the branch was!

You can see from this angle how long the branch was!

The branch broke off pretty jaggedly when Smoochie was cutting it.

The branch broke off pretty jaggedly when Smoochie was cutting it.

But he cleaned it up: hopefully the tree will survive: it was a pretty big limb.

But he cleaned it up: hopefully the tree will survive: it was a pretty big limb.

The shape of the cut looks like a crest. Maybe we can design and etch in a Spy Garden crest!
So that’s the limbing. All the wood has been cleaned up and…

Stacked!

Stacked!

As for the harvesting…Not my strong suit. I realize the garden is a vegetable garden so that may seem weird. But, the first few years I grew vegetables the deer did most of the harvesting. Then last year once the deer fence was in place, a new predator moved in. Baby took a bite of most every piece of produce and then she and The Spy enjoyed flinging squash and tomatoes around the garden. And we don’t compost (YET) (JUDGE NOT LEST YE BE JUDGED). So, yes, we may have discovered the origin of the tradition of throwing tomatoes, but my harvesting skills still need fine-tuning.

Not just a subject for photos anymore!

Not just a subject for photos anymore!

This year, I’ve been making a much better effort to harvest and make my lunch everyday from garden goodies. My go-to method has been to: fill up the sink with water and put in the whole mess of veggies and swish it around: all the dirt falls to the bottom. Then dry it off, rough chop it, pile into a roasting pan with some olive oil. I’ve had a month+ full of salads, but the heat has finally turned the lettuces pretty bitter. I’ve heard that leaving them in the fridge a few days will remove the bitter taste, but I’ve tried that and it hasn’t worked in the past. I find roasting greens (yes! even lettuce) works well. Roast around 350 for 20-40 minutes (depending on the thickness of whatever you are roasting), then make a chiffonade of lettuce leaf basil, flat leafed parsley, thyme, oregano and purple opal basil (or whatever other mix of herbs you fancy) and garnish the roasted vegetables with it (and salt/pepper). Yum!

And a few more sights from around the garden…

Banana Plant, mid-planting (given to us by a neighbor)

Banana Plant, mid-planting (given to us by a neighbor)

Squash Blossom Puppet Show

Squash Blossom Puppet Show haha

Great

Great

Spangled

Spangled

Fritillary

Fritillary

A bee? A hummingbird? A moth!

A bee? A hummingbird? A moth!

Purple Flower

Purple Flower

13 thoughts on “Limbing, Harvesting

  1. narf77

    Does it get cold where you live? If so, might want to put Mr Banana pup in a container to bring him inside when it does. Our banana lives in our glasshouse otherwise he would be kaput! Lovely shots. I put of making a compost heap because my mum went on…and on…and on… and ON about it so it was obviously something that I was going to put off forever ;). When she died the very first thing I started to do was make a compost heap. I just hurl everything into it and nature does the rest. Try making one with bales of hay…MUCH easier to manage and it all rots down together into delicious soil ameliorates that the worms adore, plus the guilt goes away when you are tossing things into the rubbish. We harvested a few spuds, a few zucchinis, NO silverbeet (that all got harvested by the possums :( ) and I just picked the last of the scarlet runner beans for growing next season. I planted out some Jerusalem artichokes that were semi-dehydrated (after being left out for about a month…) and a purple sweet potato that was turning some rather alarming shades of brown in order to stop them making me feel guilty whenever I walked past them in their slow decomposition guilt inducing way…sort of like puppy dog eyes when it’s dinner time. Love how excellent Spy Garden is looking this summer :)

    Reply
    1. Spy Garden Post author

      Thanks. Composting? Maybe next summer. My sister has started doing it and she lives in an apartment (with a good porch)! I know there’s no excuse ha! Sounds like you are still enjoying the garden in the winter. Yes, I will bring the banana plants in for the winter.

      Reply
      1. narf77

        Composting = no more guilt. Simples really ;). I was bolshie about it for years but now I just collect the bits, hurl them onto a pile and feel like I am an earth angel ;)

  2. Eliza Waters

    There were flowers in photo number three? ;-) Good God, woman, how do you get any work done with that view parading around in front of you? ;-) ;-) Good thing he cut the limb as it looked like there may have been some rot starting. Silver maples grow fast, so are a bit soft. For future reference, (IF Smoochie is open to suggestions), on limbs over 3″, if you make a 1/4 cut on the bottom first, then cut from above to meet it, you will avoid tearing. Also ginormous limbs like that are best cut twice, first time higher up, to reduce the weight. But his aim sure is true! I was surprised to learn you weren’t into harvesting after all the work you put into those garden beds. You amaze me! :-) Love the fritillary shots, they are magnificent. You’ve got me stumped on the purple flower, I’m guessing scabiosa…is it wild or one you bought? Inquiring minds need to know! As usual, love your posts!

    Reply
    1. Spy Garden Post author

      HAhahahh It is a good view. I will show Smoochie the suggestion for sure. He has cut a lot of trees down and I know he has notched things before like you describe. I’m not sure what kind of flower: pretty sure it is from a wildflower/beneficial bug mix I bought (but not sure of what the seed mix was). Thanks for the compliments;)!

      Reply
  3. toothius

    That tree looks like a silver maple that we have in the backyard. I would love to limb ours myself, but it would fall on fences and power lines and roofs unfortunately. The best estimate I have received so far is $650 to remove some limbs to create more sun for my garden.

    Reply
    1. Spy Garden Post author

      It is definitely tricky when power lines/buildings are in the line of fire! We once cut a tree down that was hanging over power lines and the house. We tied a rope to my vehicle while he cut to ensure it would fall in the proper spot: It was scary!! Luckily it worked out, but yeah sometimes you have to trust the experts!

      Reply
  4. puppiesinparadise

    I am glad to hear that your fence has done it’s job by keeping the deer out of your veggie patch. All that hard work is finally paying off that now you can harvest the fruits of your labor. I laughed when I read about the kids throwing vegetables. When I was little we use to have fruit fights.It can hur when a Plum’s pit hits you. That is why we switched to rotten fruit. We would pick the rottens fruit and throw them at eachother from our tree forts in the orchard… I am sure we would have thrown vegetables if we had a veggie patch. We of course did this when no parents were around to stop us. It sounds like your two kids just like to smash them for fun. Be glad they are not throwing them at eachother. LOL

    I too cook my lettuce and spinage in food (stir fry, Spaghetti sauces, lasagne sauces..). Your way sounds good too. I hope that you post your recipe.

    That was a huge limb your husband cut down. Your garden is looking really nice.
    Honey

    Reply
    1. Spy Garden Post author

      My “recipe” is basically just roast whatever mixed vegetables you’ve just harvested and season with salt/pepper and whatever mix of herbs. No matter the combo, its always pretty good! The orchard sounds very fun, what great memories! Thanks for the comments!

      Reply

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