Shots du Jour 1.4.14

Some random shots from today, a balmy 43. Now we’re batting down the hatches. Snow storm a few hours away and low of NEGATIVE NINE tomorrow and Monday is supposed to be a high of ONE degree Farenheit. Brrr! I know, I know, “the weather”…what a fascinating topic (maybe not so much). But the garden is certainly concerned with the elements.

Rose of Charon bush

Rose of Charon bush

Man Cave

Man Cave

The neighbor's magnolia tree foliage looks down right tropical!

The neighbor’s magnolia tree foliage looks down right tropical!

Still green in the kitchen too.

Still green in the kitchen too.

Salad has: spinach, artichokes, and green pasta dressed with pesto made from: basil, peas, garlic, olive oil, sunflower seeds, cashews, salt/pepper). Pea-basil pesto is DELISH!

The Spy is ready should a zombie apocalypse arrive with the snow storm.

The Spy is ready should a zombie apocalypse arrive with the snow storm.

An important meeting

An important meeting

The Spy

The Spy

Baby on Tree Stump

Baby on Tree Stump

Baby stylin' on Instagram (@spygarden)

Baby stylin’ on Instagram (@spygarden)

January "FAST"

January “FAST”

Compass and Sundial

Compass and Sundial

Handy little tool should we decide to set sail (which may be a bit difficult in Missouri)

Handy little tool should we decide to set sail (which may be a bit difficult in Missouri)

Another view of my favorite January decoration

Another view of my favorite January decoration

And one shot from the road (taken from the passenger seat, as I never “shoot” and drive;) haha:

Historic stone church in our area (built in 1800s)

Historic stone church in our area (built in 1800s)

Despite the angel hanging in the top window and the festive white lights, still looks very creepy in this photo.

7 thoughts on “Shots du Jour 1.4.14

  1. gardenengineer

    It may be cliche, trite even, but talking about the weather really is fascinating. For instance, here in the Northeast, the record lows of Tuesday were preceded on Monday by highs in the 50s, a huge drop in less than 24 hours. Think of how much heat had to move a great distance in a short time to make that happen. And who can resist using such a cool term as “polar vortex”?

    Reply

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