36. Same Garden, Different Day

The end-of-summer garden sights had been getting a little monotonous. But in the past few days there is a bunch of new growth on some plants and a few brand new sights too.

Rainbow Swiss Chard

Rainbow Swiss Chard

The rainbow swiss chard had really slowed down during the hot summer months and each little plant was tiny and colorful but basically dormant, not setting any new leaves at all. The cooler weather has jump-started the plants. Soon we will again be enjoying bunches of chard to eat!

Woo HOOOo!

Woo HOOOo!

I threw down a bunch of Russian Red/Ragged Jack kale seeds a few weeks ago. They were seeds I saved from the plants that were growing in the garden in the spring. I am so excited to see them popping up! Kale is a very hardy plant and if they get growing and large enough before the first frost they should be able to survive the winter.

Nasturtiums

Nasturtiums

I’ve found that nasturtiums do much better for me when they are well-shaded. The one pictured above gets shade almost all day. This one gets a lot more sun:

Nasturtium

Nasturtium (in the sun)

Nasturtium in the shade

Nasturtium in the shade

Last summer I made tempura-fried nasturtium blossoms. Such a special treat! I suppose I still have time left in the season to make them again!

The last Tigger melon

The last Tigger melon

Even though the tigger melons are awesome looking, the taste is not that exciting so I am not going to grow them again.

Patisson Golden Marbre Scallop Squash

Patisson Golden Marbre Scallop Squash

I just love these squash. They are setting tons of new fruit but they are growing in a different shape than earlier in the season. The stem-end is more bulbous and rounded. There is a bit of powdery mildew on some of the leaves. The last time I noticed powdery mildew I took a jar 1/4 full of milk and 3/4 full of water and splashed it on the leaves and that knocked it out. I plan to do that again tomorrow.

Thai Red Roselle

Thai Red Roselle

Thai Red Roselle Plant

Thai Red Roselle Plant

The pictures don’t do the Thai Red Roselle justice. It is difficult to photograph because the stems and calyxes are such a deep crimson. I will keep trying to get the perfect shot! Hoping to see the buds bloom soon too!

The largest Serpente di Sicila squash

The largest Serpente di Sicila squash

I am tempted to cut this gourd every time I go in the garden but I’m hanging on a bit longer (to see if it will get a bit longer!). You can see in the picture a ton of new growth (the darker green leaves) on these plants and they are setting tons of new fruits. In order to eat these edible gourds, they need to be harvested when immature (small zucchini size) or else the skin gets too tough. They are prepared like summer squash.

Serpente di Sicilia edible gourd forming

Serpente di Sicilia edible gourd forming

And another little fuzzy one!

And another little fuzzy one!

Loads of lime basil

Loads of lime basil

In the past I’ve had much better luck leaving the basil alone and letting it re-seed itself (as opposed to planting new seeds).

New growth on an artichoke plant (foreground) and nasturtiums in the background

New growth on an artichoke plant (foreground) and nasturtiums in the background

I’ve been debating whether or not to relocate the artichoke plants to another area. They are planted with yellow strawberries in this row:

Violet de Provence artichokes and Yellow Wonder Wild Strawberry

Violet de Provence artichokes and Yellow Wonder Wild Strawberry

I probably will move them…It is just a matter of where. Transplanting perennials in the garden (and rotating the annuals) is a good way to deter pests. And also makes the same garden look different another day!

3 thoughts on “36. Same Garden, Different Day

  1. natarunmore

    Wow Love seeing your garden! Do you have rabbits visiting? We have so many rabbits in my neighbourhood, and they ate a lot of my swiss chard this year.. sadly.. any advice for keeping them away? I don’t want to build a huge cage around it, but I’m running out of ideas.. :)

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s