17. How to Paint

This is a two-part series, or maybe three parts since I prefer odd numbers. This is Part One: Supplies

Here are the things you need:

1.            A Palette: A dinner plate with a chip in it makes the perfect palette.

Old cabinet face and chipped dinner plate aka canvas and palette

Old cabinet face and chipped dinner plate aka canvas and palette

2.            A surface to paint on: It doesn’t have to be canvas or special paper.

This is a painting I did on a piece of plywood

This is a painting I did on a piece of plywood

This is an anatomically correct skeleton I painted on a sweatshirt.

This is an anatomically correct skeleton I painted on a sweatshirt.

I strongly recommend also having card stock on hand (in addition to whatever you’re painting on). Fold it in half. This will make sense later (in Part Two).

3.            Painting clothes: clothes that are already stained, or clothes that you would like to stain. You could just paint naked (especially if you are two and under) but I find that a bit too uncivilized. Even for a baby.

Painting clothes

Painting clothes

4.            Paints: The obvious choice for painting with kids (especially two-year olds) would be non-toxic, washable paint. However, Spy Garden loathes the obvious so we prefer good permanent (staining) acrylic paint. The pigments are so much richer and superior. We do have washable, non-toxic paint and that is good for a quick activity but if the goal is a painting you actually want to display go for the good stuff. Plus I mean “non-toxic”, really? How much paint are you planning to let your kid eat?

"Hmmm...should I taste this?"

“Hmmm…should I taste this?”

5.            Some brushes. NOT EVER those awful plastic ones that come in those cheap sets of watercolor paints.

These should be banned from the planet.

These should be banned from the planet.

They are useless. Kids (or anyone) want to see results and those wretched brushes can barely hold any paint. It is so frustrating to have continually dip in the paint over and over. You need bigger brushes.

A few different shapes and sizes

A few different shapes and sizes

6. An old cup half-filled with water (or “half-empty” {if you are trying to evoke your inner tortured artist}).

I prefer "half-full"

I prefer “half-full”

7. A room you would like to destroy. Alternatively, a yard, deck, porch, patch of dead grass, etc.

8. An easel. Alternatively, a wall or tree.

9. Optional: A picture, drawing, still life, object or idea for use as inspiration for the subject of your painting.

Stay tuned for Part Two tomorrow!

6 thoughts on “17. How to Paint

  1. Pingback: 51. Black Walnut Ink | Spy Garden

  2. Pingback: 20. Progress Report II | Spy Garden

  3. Mominthegarden

    I’m jumping over to part two now as I’m a bit behind with my blog reading! Your work is amazing! I’m delighted with any insights you would give, given your incredible talent. :-) Dana

    Reply
  4. Pingback: 18. How to Paint: Part Deux | Spy Garden

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