Color Explosion

Overnight it seems there has been an explosion of color in the garden!

Hartman's Giant amaranth and sunflower

Hartman’s Giant amaranth and sunflower

The aptly named "Cherry Vanilla" quinoa

The aptly named “Cherry Vanilla” quinoa

Yardlong beans forming

Yard-long beans forming

I just love yard-long beans. They are so unusual. We are growing Chinese Red Noodle Bean (from seeds I saved from last year’s plants):

80 days.This is the most stunning and unique bean I have grown yet. Fantastic deep red 18-inch pods are so delicious, full of nutrition, and they even keep most their color when sautéed! Long vines produce all summer and do well under many conditions. This incredible variety will draw lots of attention in your home garden or at market. We are so excited to offer this unique Chinese ethnic variety that produces fairly early. Small red seeds. (from www.rareseeds.com)

So interesting to watch how they grow

So interesting to watch how they grow

And we are also growing Thai Purple Podded Yard Long Bean:

Vigorous, high-yielding Thai variety. The lovely, deep purple pods have green tips, are crisp and stay tender to amazing lengths often reaching 20 inches! The productive variety is a local favorite in Thailand where long beans are appreciated as a very important staple crop. (from www.rareseeds.com)

And the "noodle" beans do grow fast!

And the “noodle” beans do grow fast!

The two varieties look identical (so I can’t tell which is which).

Two bumblebees in a squash blossom

Two bumblebees in a squash blossom

The Tigger melons continue to change color

The Tigger melons continue to change color

The greenery around this melon is a mass of citrus mint.

Violet de Provence: the last bloom

Violet de Provence: the last bloom

Violet de Provence

Violet de Provence artichoke

Rainbow sweet Inca corn

Rainbow sweet Inca corn

This corn would be doing better if it was getting some more sun. A maple tree has started to shade the bottom part of the garden. More about the Inca sweet corn:

A beautiful multicolored corn that was developed by Dr. Alan Kapuler. This sweet corn is wonderful cooked fresh, when the colors are still very pale; delicious real corn flavor. Mature ears are great for grinding into flavorful flour, and are perfect for fall decorations. The kids will love this one. (from www.rareseeds.com)

This corn is planted in the “back nine” part of the garden with sorghum (yellow bonnet), amaranth and sunflowers. Here are some pictures of this area:

East border of the "back nine"

East border of the “back nine”

One step to the left of the previous picture looking through the plants

One step to the left of the previous picture looking through the plants

View facing south (Just beyond the obelisk is the sorghum)

View facing south (Just beyond the obelisk is the sorghum)

The seedheads of the amaranth are great, but I think the neon pink stalks are my favorite part of the plant!

The seed heads of the amaranth are great, but I think the neon pink stalks are my favorite part of the plant!

An amaranth plant in the tomato patch

An amaranth plant in the tomato patch

Yellow strawberries

Yellow strawberries

Beet (Early Wonder)

Beet (Early Wonder)

Ailsa Craig onion

Ailsa Craig onion

Shouldn’t those beets and onions be growing underground? Yes, but in the areas in the garden where the soil is a bit more clay the root vegetables sometimes perch on top of the dirt.

Airplane (they must have a nice view of the garden!)

Airplane (they must have a nice view of the garden!)

Dexie with a Serpente di Sicilia edible gourd

Dexie with a Serpente di Sicilia edible gourd

6 thoughts on “Color Explosion

  1. Pingback: 10. Progress Report | Spy Garden

  2. The Belmont Rooster

    Great photos! I was trying to get a photo of a hummingbird this afternoon, but it is very difficult. By the time it is still the camera was out of focus. Then this butterfly, or what looked like a butterfly, kept chasing it away. Once it chased the hummingbird clear up into a tree.

    Reply

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